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The Head of General Security for the Dubai Emirate, Lieutenant General Dahi Khalfan Tamim, has stated that Palestinians should abandon their aspiration for an independent state and merge with Israeli Jews in a united, bi-national state instead.

In a series of remarks published on his Twitter account Monday afternoon, Tamim attempted to garner support for his idea, claiming that a Palestinian state led by Arabs would join the list of failed states in the Arab world.

According to Tamim, the dream of such a state will never come true, since "Israel will only recognize Palestine if Palestinians become part of it."


Tamim controversially stated: "I suggest relinquishing the idea of a Palestinian state and being satisfied with an Israeli state that would include both Israelis and Palestinians and join the Arab League."

"Today, the Jews are heading the world's economy, without the Jews you Arabs would not have known how to deposit your money in the bank," Tamim continued.

In light of what he described as Arab incompetence in running a state and the distinguished economic talents of Jews, Tamim claimed that a joint Jewish-Palestinian state will only prosper under Israeli leadership.

However, according to his thesis, this bi-national state would ultimately become an Arab state, where Jews will be a minority, as Jewish citizens in the Arab world are.

"Seventy years after the bi-national state would be established, the Arab minority would become the majority and rule the state, just like it happened in South Africa," Tamim tweeted.

In another tweet that spurred controversy, the Dubai security chief wrote: "We should not treat Jews as our enemies. We should treat them as cousins with whom we have a controversy over land inheritance. "

In order to test the feasibility of his idea, Tamim asked his Twitter followers if they think Palestinians and Jews can live together in an Israeli-ruled state. Not surprisingly, 57 percent of the followers answered that "'Jews have no place in our country."

Source: jpost
Smoke and flames rise over a hill near a Syrian town after an airstrike
A brave Russian special forces soldier who was on a Rambo-style one man mission to hunt for ISIS militants died a "hero" after calling in an airstrike on HIMSELF.

The fearless officer was directing Russian airstrikes at Islamic State targets near the ancient city of Palmyra in Syria when he was surrounded by terrorists.

Not prepared to go down without a fight, he ordered military officials to drop bombs on his location and died in the blast.

A spokesperson for the Russian military said: "An officer of Russian special operations forces was killed near Palmyra while carrying out a special task to direct Russian airstrikes at Islamic State group targets."

Russian Air Force's long-range aviation carry
out airstrikes against ISIS targets in Syria
"The officer was carrying out a combat task in Palmyra area for a week, identifying crucial IS targets and passing exact coordinates for strikes with Russian planes.

"The officer died as a hero, he drew fire onto himself after being located and surrounded by terrorists."

Moscow has been tight-lipped about having any soldiers on the ground throughout its campaign in Syria that began on September 30.

Last week IS-linked media said that five Russian special forces were killed near Palmyra, publishing pictures from their cellphones and a video showing a bloodied corpse.
Syrian troops in the outskirts of
the ancient city of Palmyra

However Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov at the time denied that Russian officers were participating in the advance on Palmyra, saying that "the advance is carried out by contingents of the Syrian army".


Syrian troops on Thursday entered the ancient city of Palmyra, which had been controlled by IS since last May, and clashes were ongoing in the city.

Backed by Russian warplanes and allied militia on the ground, the Syrian army advanced into Palmyra after launching a desert offensive early this month, said the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights.

The defence ministry in Moscow said Russian aircraft carried out 146 strikes on "terrorist targets" in the Palmyra area between Wednesday and last Sunday.

Hundreds of protesters have taken to the streets in several areas across Bahrain to vent their anger at the ruling Al Khalifa regime’s crackdown and attacks against political dissidents.

On Wednesday evening, demonstrators staged a rally in the town of A'ali, situated about three kilometers (1.8 miles) southeast of the capital, Manama, shouting anti-regime slogans and demanding the downfall of King Hamad bin Isa Al Khalifa.

Elsewhere in the northwestern village of Diraz, 12 kilometers (7 miles) southeast of Manama, demonstrators stressed that they would continue with peaceful protests for the fulfillment of their democratic demands.

Protesters also marched along streets in the village of Abu Saiba, west of the capital, holding portraits of Sheikh Ali Salman, who heads Bahrain’s main opposition bloc, al-Wefaq National Islamic Society. They denounced Saudi Arabia's military presence in Bahrain and chanted slogans against the Al Saud regime.

A similar anti-regime demonstration was held in the village of Muqaba, where protesters condemned the regime’s heavy-handed crackdown against dissidents. They also demanded the immediate release of all political prisoners.

Since February 14, 2011, thousands of anti-regime protesters have held numerous rallies on an almost daily basis in Bahrain, calling for the Al Khalifa family to relinquish power.

In March that year, troops from Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates were deployed to the country to assist the Bahraini government in its crackdown on peaceful protests.

Scores of people have been killed and hundreds of others injured or arrested in the crackdowns.

Amnesty and many other international rights organizations have frequently censured the Bahraini regime over the “rampant” human rights abuses against opposition activists and anti-regime protesters, Press TV reported.

Over 4,000 Saudi mercenaries, including 178 commanders, have been killed during the year-long Riyadh-led war against Yemen, a Yemeni intelligence source said on Thursday.

"At least, 4,000 Saudi mercenaries have been killed during the savage aggression of the Saudi-led Arab coalition against Yemen in the past one year," the source told FNA.

He said that tens of the Saudi mercenaries killed by the Yemeni army and popular forces have been Sudanese, Djiboutian, and even Chechnian nationals, adding that 178 commanders are seen among the Saudi death toll in Yemen war, "a fact that has always been kept secret the Saudi media".

His remarks came after the Yemeni army and popular forces destroyed the Saudi military positions and bases in Ma'rib province with a ballistic missile, killing tens of the kingdom's forces.

The Qaher-I ballistic missile hit Saudi Arabia's Tadavin military base in Ma'rib province in Yemen on Wednesday, Arabic-language media outlets reported.

Early reports indicate large casualties on the Saudi forces in the missile attack. The Saudi army and its coalition members have lost, at least, over a hundred troops each time they have come under a ballistic missile attack by Yemen.

The Yemeni forces have fired tens of missiles on the military positions and gathering centers of Saudi-led coalition so far, killing hundreds of Saudi forces and injuring many more.

In a relevant development last week, the Qaher-I missile hit al-Khanjar military base in al-Jawf province, destroying their military hardware and equipment.

The Saudi-led forces' armored vehicles were destroyed during the Yemeni missile attack.

Scores of Saudi forces were killed and injured in the Yemeni missile strikes.

In late February, a Yemeni Tochka missile hit the Saudi-led coalition's military base in Ma'rib province, killing tens of coalition servicemen, including 8 senior Saudi and UAE officers.

A Commander of Yemen's Ansarullah Movement confirmed firing of the ballistic missile at the Ma'as military base in Ma'rib in Central Yemen.

He noted that at least 48 Saudi forces were killed in Yemen's Tochka missile attack.

Also on February 3, the Yemeni forces rained down a barrage of missiles at the Saudi forces' military tower in Al-Dokhan region in Jizan province in Southern Saudi Arabia.

Al-Dokhan tower was reportedly destroyed in the Yemeni missile attacks in Jizan as eyewitnesses said that they had seen smoke rising from it.

The Yemeni army and popular forces regained control of Al-Khurma region in Asir province after they destroyed two arms depots and other military hardware of the Yemeni forces in the region.

Meantime, the Yemeni army's artillery units pounded Malhama military base in Jizan province. The Saudi troops started fleeing their base as soon as they came under the missile attack, FNA reported.
ISIS Lost 22% of Territory in Syria, Iraq since January 2015: IHS
ISIS Lost 22% of Territory in Syria, Iraq since January 2015: IHS

Military analysts at IHS Jane’s say the Takfiri ISIS terrorist group has lost control of 22 percent of territory it held in Iraq and Syria since the beginning of 2015. 
 
The IHS Conflict Monitor said in a report released on Wednesday that the ISIS terrorists lost 14 percent of swathes of territory they held in 2015 and a further eight percent this year.
The report stated that the US and Russian air raids have contributed to the advance of forces fighting ISIS.

Columb Strack, senior analyst at IHS, said the Syrian government has made gains in western Syria and is now five kilometers outside the ancient city of Palmyra, which was captured by ISIS in mid-2015.
IHS Jane's said the terrorists controlled 73,440 square kilometers (28,360 square miles) of ground as of Monday.

ISIS is “increasingly isolated, and being perceived as in decline," said Strack, who added that "isolation and further military defeats" will make it harder for ISIS "to attract new recruits to Syria from the pool of foreign jihadists."

IHS further noted that ISIS has begun to suffer financial difficulties since it lost the strategically important town of Tal Abyad on Syria's border with Turkey last year.

Strack said the US and Russian air attacks have exacerbated the group's financial difficulties as the warplanes hit the terrorists’ sources of oil revenue.

Russia launched its air campaign against the Takfiri ISIS terrorists and other militant groups in Syria on September 30 upon a request from the Damascus government, but the country announced pulling out its military equipment from Syria on Monday, saying its campaign had contributed to "radically change the situation in the fight against terrorism."

The US, along with some of its allies, has also been conducting air raids against purported ISIS positions inside Syria without an authorization from Damascus or a UN mandate since September 2014. The air assaults are an extension of the US-led aerial campaign in neighboring Iraq, which started in August that year.

Many parties to the coalition are widely accused of having contributed to the rise of terror groups in Syria over the past few years, Press TV reported.

The French colonial green, white, and black banner of Syria adapted by the West’s proxy “Free Syrian Army” (FSA) had long been forgotten in the sea of black banners held aloft by Washington and Riyadh’s more extreme ploy to gain leverage upon and more direct access to the battlefield.

However, as Syrian forces backed by its regional allies and Russian airpower overwhelm these forces while building alliances with other factions, including the Kurds, the West’s entire regime change enterprise faces ignominious collapse.

It appears that – having exhausted all other options – the West has decided to change as many of those black banners back to the “rebel” green, white, and black as possible, before the conflict draws to a close, giving the West the most favorable position achievable ahead of “peace talks.”

The West’s Shape-Shifting Proxies 

For years, just looking at maps – including those produced by Washington-based think tanks themselves – revealed the true nature of Syria’s ongoing conflict. Forces could be seen flowing into the country as one would expect amid an invasion, not a “civil war.” While the West’s military campaigns over and upon Syrian soil claimed to be taking on the so-called “Islamic State” (ISIS), it was clear that nothing was being done about cutting off the obvious supply corridors sustaining ISIS’ fighting capacity.

In other words, the US and its “coalition’s” war on ISIS was feigned. No genuine military campaign would ever be fought on the front lines while neglecting the enemy’s logistical lifelines – especially when those lifelines led from NATO territory.

It wasn’t until Russia’s intervention on behalf of the Syrian government, that these corridors were targeted and disrupted – thus fully exposing the gambit for all the world to see.
Not surprisingly, as soon as this began, it had an immediate effect on the West’s proxy forces across the country. Since then, Russian-backed Syrian forces have incrementally begun sealing off Syria’s borders, isolating stranded terrorist factions within the interior of the country, and retaking territory as these forces atrophy and dissipate.

For years it has been asked why the West has done nothing about cutting these obvious supply corridors leading into Syria and sustaining terrorist factions like ISIS, Al Nusra, and their allies – groups which now clearly constitute the vast majority of militants fighting the Syrian government – even by the US government’s own admission.

As the global public becomes increasingly aware of this glaring point of logic, it appears that the West is now attempting to cynically leverage it, while simultaneously rescuing thousands of trapped terrorist mercenaries facing encirclement and eradication in the closing phases of the Syrian conflict.
Just last week, the “New Syrian Army,” a monkier for the discredited FSA, suddenly appeared on the Iraqi-Syrian border, “cutting off” ISIS supply lines leading back and forth between the two countries.
Reuters in their article, “Syrian rebels seize Iraq border crossing from Islamic State: monitor,” would claim:
Syrian rebel fighters seized a border crossing with Iraq from Islamic State on Friday, Britain-based war monitor the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said.

Islamic State had controlled the al-Tanf border crossing, which is also near the Syrian-Jordanian border, since May last year after seizing it from Syrian government forces. It had been the last border crossing with Iraq that was under the control of the Syrian government.
The only “source” is the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights, which is in fact a single man living in England who regularly coordinates with the British Foreign Ministry.

One could ask why such border interdiction operations haven’t been done before, and in fact, why these “rebels” who are admittedly harbored, trained, funded, and armed in Jordan and Turkey to begin with, didn’t first begin by securing Syria’s borders to prevent ISIS from entering the country in precisely the same areas “rebels” are supposedly operating?

The answer is simple. The West had no intention of stopping ISIS. In fact, ISIS is the “rebels” and the “rebels” are ISIS. Their “taking” of the Syrian-Iraqi border is superficial at best. The weapons, cash, and fighters will still flow, just as they do past NATO forces along the Turkish-Syrian border. The only difference is that now these terrorists will be flying the “FSA” flag, lending them protection amid a ceasefire agreed to in good faith by the Syrian government and its allies.

Rebels are Not Prevailing – ISIS is Just Flying a New Flag 

The ceasefire has, at least temporarily, bought time for terrorists groups Syria and Russia have – perhaps mistakenly – recognized as militant groups to be negotiated with. Taking full advantage of this, the “FSA” is now suddenly appearing as if rising from the dead, everywhere ISIS and Al Qaeda have dominated for years.

The New York Times published its own desperate bid to convince the global public that once again “pro-democracy protesters” were climbing out of the rubble in Idlib and Aleppo – two cities admittedly overrun by Al Qaeda and ISIS long ago – and flying the “FSA” flag.
The article titled, “Syrian Protesters Take to Streets as Airstrikes Ease,” claims that:

Street protests erupted across insurgent-held areas of Syria on Friday, as demonstrators took advantage of the relative lull in airstrikes during a partial truce, coming out in the largest numbers in years to declare that even after five punishing years of war they still wanted political change. 

Under the slogan “The Revolution Continues,” demonstrators waved the green, white and black pre-Baathist flag adopted during the early, largely peaceful stages of the revolt, before the proliferation of armed Islamist factions with black jihadist banners.
Five years on from the so-called “Arab Spring,” the fully engineered nature of the original protests in 2011 have been so thoroughly exposed and understood by the public, that few if anyone believes these protests now are anything but a desperately staged public-relations campaign to prove that there are people elsewhere besides Washington, Langley, London, and Brussels, that still seeks regime change in Syria.

The West’s terrorist proxies are changing from a war-footing – having lost the war – to a last-ditch posture of claiming legitimate opposition in hopes of salvaging what’s left of the political networks and terrorist fronts that collaborated with the West in this highly destructive conspiracy.

“Uprising” in Al Raqqa

Finally, in the very heart of the West’s proxy terrorist forces, Al Raqqa – the defacto capital of ISIS – there are suddenly reports of “uprisings” by the local population. This happens conveniently as the Syrian Arab Army approaches from the west and Kurds descend upon the city from the northeast.
Leading up to this “uprising” was a story in the London Telegraph titled, “Islamic State ‘hit by cash crisis in its capital Raqqa‘,” which claims:

Faced with a cash shortage in its self-declared caliphate, the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant has slashed salaries, asked Raqqa residents to pay utility bills in black market American dollars, and is now releasing detainees for a price of $500 a person.
While the Telegraph credits “coalition airstrikes” for this turn of fortune, it is quite obvious that Syrian and Russian airstrikes along the Turkish border destroying entire convoys bound for ISIS territory has led to a reduction in ISIS’ fighting capacity as well as its ability to administer seized territory.
Image: If Major Yaser Abdulrahim looks like he’s
never wore his FSA uniform out into the field,
that’s because he hasn’t. He is not a member of
the FSA at all, and is instead a commander of
the Fatah Halab, an umbrella group for Al Qaeda
affiliates armed and funded by both the US and
Saudi Arabia.

With a terrorist force the West has spent 5 years and untold billions creating facing complete encirclement and eradication, what options are left? An “uprising” where suddenly the entire city is flying “FSA” flags, thus negating the need for Syrian or Kurdish forces to move in and retake the city?

That appears to be the narrative the West is already preparing – in Raqqa and elsewhere across Syria – as a component amid the so-called “ceasefire” and “peace talks.”

The BBC had dressed up a terrorist commander in FSA regalia for an interview – but included footage of the commander in the field operating under clearly terrorist banners. It was but an individual example of what it appears the West is doing now on a much larger scale – playing dress-up to save its immense but now stranded terrorist hordes.

During early victories against the West’s proxy forces, Al Qaeda and ISIS militants would dress as women to flee the battlefield. Now, they are dressing up as the otherwise nonexistent “FSA.”

Will the West expect Syria and its allies to negotiate with this phantom army operating under a fictional banner? For Syria and its allies, what the West is doing is a clear violation of the spirit of the ceasefire and of upcoming peace talks. It is also a reaffirmation of the West’s disingenuous commitment to fighting terrorism – clearly using it as a tool to fight its battles for it,  to serve as a pretext for intervening when terrorism alone cannot achieve an objective, and then, when all else fails, covering up entire legions of terrorists so that they can live to fight another day.

Claiming 'incitement,' Israel shuts down Palestine Today, arrests Palestinian journalists, and convinces a French satellite company to drop a Palestinian TV station.

Early in the morning on Friday, March 11th, dozens of Israeli soldiers raided the offices of Palestine Today (Falastin al-Yawm) in al-Bireh in the West Bank. The soldiers damaged the TV station’s offices, confiscated technical equipment, and ordered the station's closure with a military order. The Israeli Army claims the TV station is guilty of “incitement” against Israel.

During the raid, Israeli forces arrested two employees of Palestine Today: Mohammed Amr and Shabeeb Shabeeb.

Israeli soldiers proceeded to raid TransMedia Production Company in the West Bank city of Ramallah. TransMedia provides satellite TV services to stations in Palestine; it is the broadcasting servicer for Palestine Today.
 
At the same time, another group of Israeli soldiers sought out Farouq Elayyat, the General Director of Palestine Today, at his home in Birziet and arrested him as well.

Israeli forces released Amr and Shabeeb after holding them for a few hours. Elayyat, however, remains detained.

Groups from across Palestinian decried the closure of Palestine Today. The Palestinian Journalists Union, Palestinian Liberation Organization and human rights centers issued statements condemning the closure of the station and described it as clear evidence of the occupation’s intent to both broadly restrict freedom of press in Palestine and specifically restrict news coverage on the current popular uprising.

The Islamic movement and other concerned Palestinians gathered outside of Palestine Today’s offices in Gaza to protest the TV station’s closure in the West Bank. Palestine Today was able to continue broadcasting this weekend from its Gaza offices.

Also on Friday, Israeli authorities ordered the extention of journalist Sami al-Saee’s detention for eight days. Al-Saee, a correspondent for al-Fajr al-Jadid, was arrested on Wednesday, March 9th on charges of “incitement.”

The next day, Saturday, March 12th, the French satellite giant Eutelsat announced that it will no longer air al-Aqsa Television, a Hamas-affiliated TV station. Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu had been pushing Eutelsat to drop al-Aqsa TV due to its alleged anti-Israel content. A day prior to the announcement, Netanyahu had called French President Francois Hollande to insist that the French government work with Eutelsat to stop airing al-Aqsa TV for broadcasting “incitement to violence against Israelis.” Following news that Eutelsat will abandon the station, Netanyahu thanked Hollande for his “help.”

Al-Aqsa TV was back on air on Saturday, however, with the assistance of the Egyptian satellite company Nilesat and Arabsat, a company stationed in Saudi Arabia. Despite its new partners, the TV station’s future remains in question: some speculate Israel hoped for Arab satellite companies to take on al-Aqsa TV so that Israel can pursue its demise without the diplomatic hang-ups posed by closing a TV station in France and, perversely, with the opportunity to justify its actions by appealing to anti-Arab racism in the Western world.

Israel’s renewed commitment to suppressing Palestinian media was set into motion by an impromptu Israeli security meeting last week, at which Netanyahu ordered Palestinian media channels broadcasting “incitement” to be shutdown. Israeli authorities’ quick actions against Palestinian news stations and journalists over the weekend, both at home and abroad, indicate that Netanyahu’s recent order harbors severe repercussions for Palestinian press.

However, this is not the first time Israel has silenced Palestinian media: four months ago, the Israeli occupation closed four Palestinian radio stations – two in Hebron, one in Jenin and the fourth in Nablus. Moreover, there are at least eighteen Palestinian journalists currently in Israeli detention.